Routine Examination

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Routine Examination

For us here at Dental@155 this is anything but routine.

There are 12 key aspects checked every time to assess the overall health of your mouth.

  • How healthy you feel your mouth is
  • If you have any problems or concerns
  • Your medical status
  • Your lifestyle factors
  • Your progress from your last visit
  • Your wish list
  • The health of your teeth
  • The state of your restorations
  • Your gum health
  • If any plaque is present
  • The health of your other oral tissues
  • Those areas hidden from view

So why are we so concerned about your oral health

Well

Your mouth is the pathway for fuel to enter your body to ensure that it functions to it’s optimum.

So, if you cannot eat well how do you expect the engine to run??

Then there are the links that are well documented with other aspects of general health

Diabetes and Periodontal Disease

Diabetic patients are more likely to develop periodontal disease, which in turn can increase blood sugar and diabetic complications.

People with diabetes are more likely to have periodontal disease than people without diabetes, probably because people with diabetes are more susceptible to contracting infections. In fact, periodontal disease is often considered a complication of diabetes. Those people who don’t have their diabetes under control are especially at risk.

Research has suggested that the relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease goes both ways – periodontal disease may make it more difficult for people who have diabetes to control their blood sugar.

Severe periodontal disease can increase blood sugar, contributing to increased periods of time when the body functions with a high blood sugar. This puts people with diabetes at increased risk for diabetic complications, such as end stage kidney disease – people suffering with diabetes and severe gum disease have a mortality rate 3 times higher than those without gum disease.

SO ORAL HEALTH SHOULD BE PROMOTED IN PEOPLE WITH DIABETES AS AN INTEGRAL PART OF THEIR OVERALL DIABETES MANAGEMENT

Respiratory Disease

Research has found that bacteria that grow in the oral cavity can be aspirated into the lungs to cause respiratory diseases such as pneumonia, especially in people with periodontal disease.

Cancer

Researchers found that men with gum disease were 49% more likely to develop kidney cancer, 54% more likely to develop pancreatic cancer, and 30% more likely to develop blood cancers.

Stroke

Additional studies have pointed to a relationship between periodontal disease and stroke.

Logically there are “plaques” formed because of a constant inflammatory response of the body’s immune system – these plaques film up the inside of arteries same as hard water deposits in your kettle.

And so it would be similar when looking at……………

Gum Disease and Heart Disease

Several studies have shown that periodontal disease is associated with heart disease. Research indicates that periodontal disease increases the risk of heart disease.

Scientists believe that inflammation caused by periodontal disease may be responsible for the association.

Periodontal disease can also exacerbate existing heart conditions

And again, logically – if the body is in a constant state of stress because of an inflammatory response in the mouth then there will be an impact on the continuation in that oral cavity – INFLAMMATORY BOWEL diseases are increasing – again there is a definite 2-way process whereby ulceration in the bowel can lead to ulceration in the oral cavity and a stressed system will not help the stability of that IBS.

SO WHAT IS STOPPING YOU FROM BOOKING THAT “ROUTINE” EXAM AND STARTING THE WAY TO A NEW HEALTHY YOU

Contact us now Dental@155 or call 01332 209647.